Fillmore Soil and Water
     Conservation District
     507-765-3878 Ext. 3

     900 Washington St. NW
     Preston, MN 55965

 


Grazing Management

A newsletter with articles related to Grazing Management has been developed as a joint venture by the Natural Resource Conservation Service, Fillmore Soil and Water Conservation District, University of Minnesota Extension Service and the Grazing Lands Conservation Association.   

Grazing Gazette January/February 2017
March/April 2017
May/June 2017
July/August 2017

 

Grazing Gazette January/February 2016
  March/April 2016
  May/June 2016
  July/August 2016
  September/October 2016
  November/December 2016
Grazing Gazette January/February 2015
  March/April 2015
  May/June 2015
  July/August 2015
  September/October 2015
  November/December 2015
Grazing Gazette January/February 2014
  March/April 2014
  May/June 2014
  July/August 2014
  September/October 2014
  November/December 2014

2014 GLCA Video Conference

Grazing Gazette January/February 2013
  March/April 2013
  May/June 2013
  July/August 2013
  Special August Edition 2013
  September/October 2013
  November/December 2013

October 2013 GLCA Newsletter

 

Click here to see how Clean Water Legacy funding has been used for the Root River Grazing Management Initiative.

Grazing Management assistance is available for producers living within the Root River Watershed who would like to improve their grazing systems.

                                                                                                         

Many current grazing systems continuously graze one large pasture throughout the growing season.  One way to increase the forage productivity of the pasture is to break it into smaller sections and rotationally graze the pastures.  Rotational systems can increase productivity of your pasture as much as 50 to 100 percent which in turn will result in increased economic gains by increasing cattle productivity and reducing the amount of supplemental feeding that may need to be done.

The key to managing good cattle is managing good forage.  Maximum production occurs when grazing is initiated when the forage is eight inches tall and terminated when the forage is grazed down to four inches tall.  Leaving four inches of stubble will extend your grazing season leading to healthier and more vigorous plants and more productive pastures.  When pastures are more productive, cattle are more productive.

Assistance is open to any livestock producers that would like to improve their operations.  Cost-share funds may also be available. 

Prescribed Grazing Poster

Dean Thomas of Fountain is the Grazing Management Specialist.  He and his father Glen have been operating their own rotational grazing system on their farm for ten years.  He has hands-on experience with the practical aspects of a grazing management system and can develop an individualized plan that will increase your productivity. 

For those interested in setting up a managed grazing plan or

in getting cost share to implement a grazing plan, contact

Dean at the Fillmore SWCD office at (507) 765-3878 Ext. 3

for more information.

 

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